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Book & Record Pairing

Book & Record Pairing

Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes by Anne Elizabeth Moore and Haxel Princess by Cherry Glazerr

Anne Elizabeth Moore’s Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes released on Tuesday. Every day, heinous acts are perpetrated on women's bodies in this political economy—whether for entertainment, in the guise of medicine, or due to the conditions of labor that propel consumerism. In Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes, award-winning journalist and Fulbright scholar Anne Elizabeth Moore explores the global toll of capitalism on women with thorough research and surprising humor. The essays range from probing journalistic investigations, such as Moore’s reporting on the labor conditions of the Cambodian garment industry, to the uncomfortably personal, as when Moore, who suffers from several autoimmune disorders, examines her experiences seeking care and community in the increasingly complicated (and problematic) American healthcare system. Featuring illustrations by Xander Marro, Body Horror is a fascinating and revealing portrait of the gore of contemporary American culture and politics.

Clementine Creevy, musician and Transparent actor, created Cherry Glazerr when she was 14. Back in 2014, much-loved Cali imprint Burger Records released Cherry Glazerr’s intoxicating debut Haxel Princess. The New York Times called ‘Grilled Cheese’ one of their Top Songs of 2014. Haxel Princess is back in print thanks to Secretly Canadian Records.

National Poetry Month

National Poetry Month

We're so excited about National Poetry Month, that we are offering 20% off all Curbside Splendor poetry titles, including Artifice Books for the entire month of April. 

That means you can pick up Sara Woods's Wolf Doctors, and write your own poetry thanks to her writing prompts like:

Write a poem on paper made of someone else's hair. Become a nobel-man. Get real good at hopscotch.

Or

A teen romance about a love triangle between Lake Superior and two of Jupiter's moons. Feel free to pick any two moons you like! My favorite are Callisto and and Ganymede.

So get in here and celebrate reading and writing poetry!

Book & Record Pairing

Book & Record Pairing

The BreakBeat Poets and Moh Lhean by WHY?

Yoni Wolf and WHY? have done it again. With the new album, Moh Lhean, Yoni brings back his classic world play combined with the band’s progressive instrumentals, circa their Alopecia era. In “This Ole King,” Wolf lays out lines like, “When I expire/Down dirtward all my hunger/In fire burn my anger/And collapse my stature,” in the vein of WHY? classics, such as “The Hallows” or “Strawberries.”

The evident passion put into the production of Moh Lhean is sure to come through in their live performance. WHY? is not to be missed at their Thalia Hall performance March 17th. Come grab tickets at the store’s box office and get 20% off everything, including the new album.

The BreakBeat Poets is the first poetry anthology by and for the Hip-Hop generation. Edited by Kevin Coval, Quraysh Ali Lansana, and Nate Marshall, this anthology redefines what it means to create poetry in the age of Hip-Hop, and how the style has symbiotically influences modern poetry. Chance the Rapper says it’s, “A cool & diversified version of a mix tape.” Includes pieces from Douglas Kearney, Ocean Vuong, francine j. harris, and many more.

Hip-Hop’s not dead. These artists are here to prove it’s thriving and making its mark in our culture.

MOH LHEAN is our 3/3 from Joyful Noise Records.

my weapon of choice

?

I chose my voice.

When writing wasn’t enuf

to move

you

mic check.    mate.

one

two.

1.

2.

“from mic check, 1 -2.” by jessica Care moore

Book & Record Pairing

Book & Record Pairing

Ghost County by John McCarthy and Supermoon by S. Carey

I watched S. Carey perform a small handful of his songs in a tree house last summer. After live scoring a poetry reading from Honoree Fanonne Jeffers, Sean Carey and his band played their set in the woods, off the path between the two main staging areas at last year’s Eaux Claires Festival. About 75 of us huddled together around the elevated, wooden platform, careful to avoid poison ivy and stepping on each other’s toes. With the first note, everything stilled. His stripped down atmospheric songs cut down to the core.

Carey, perhaps better known as collaborator and band member of Bon Iver, spends most of his time fishing and raising his family in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He’s as Midwestern as they come. Supermoon provides bare essential versions of his already openly exposed songs. Carey trims down some older songs, covers Radiohead’s “Bullet Proof . . . I Wish I Was,” and gives us the new titular track.

John McCarthy’s debut poetry collection, Ghost County echoes the same strange, sad terrain as S. Carey. McCarthy captures rural Midwest with lines like, “Nothing says forever like covering ink up with a Carhartt” in the section amply titled “Pickup Truck.” His voice is raw and tells the story of the Midwest in a way that seems beyond his own years. Ghost County exposes the bleakness of the land in only as many words McCarthy needs to do so.

Get out of the city and back to the openness of the Midwest with these works.

I will lie about it all

to relieve you the burden,

explaining how we are ghosts

and we want our ghost child

to be the best damn shadow

this side of the light . . . 

- From “Pickup Truck” in Ghost County

February 17 Mixtape

February 17 Mixtape

By now you’ve probably come down from your conversation heart sugar overload and realized the commercialism that is Valentine’s Day is passé and you’ve told yourself that next Valentine’s Day you’re not going to fight over elbow room with neighboring couples and dish out too much money for an ounce of beef tartar, especially when the vegetarian options looked immensely better during your eight bites of your eight course meal.

Next year, stay at home, put on a record, crack open a bottle of wine, and cook something special for someone special: a lover, a friend, your dog walker, whoever you care about.

This month we’re sampling the soundtrack for that meal. And we may or may not have thrown in a handful of tunes that aren’t as much on the lovey-dovey side of the spectrum, because what brings people closer than a little emotional teardown? Get swept up in Bon Iver’s new album 22, A Million, or come down with his drummer, S. Carey’s stripped-down EP Supermoon. Put on an upbeat front with La Sera’s Music For Listening To Music To, while basking in their subtly crushing lyrics, a la Morrissey style. Then while you’re contemplating if you cooked the mussels long enough, or you should have skipped the cream in your carbanara so you’re not left with some sort of milk and noodle soup, flip over Dan Rico’s Endless Love to that B-side and let his “Casual Feeling” take those worries away, at least for a little while.

Book & Record Pairing: January 20, 2017

Book & Record Pairing: January 20, 2017

Well this one is just common sense. This week, we are pairing Bikini Kill’s debut, self titled EP alongside Jessica Hopper’s THE FIRST COLLECTION OF CRITICISM BY A LIVING FEMALE ROCK CRITIC.

Jessica Hopper was the teenage face of Riot Grrrl, thanks to a 1992 Newsweek article. In her collection, Hopper writes, “I too had a hunger for music that spoke a language I was just starting to decipher . . . I was lucky I was met at the door with things like the Bikini Kill demo . . . It took seeing Babes in Toyland and Bikini Kill to truly throw on the lights, to show me that there was more than one place, one role, for women to occupy, and that our participation was important and vital – it was YOU MATTER writ large.” (19-20).

Known for pioneering the Riot Grrrl movement in the early 1990s Pacific Northwest, Bikini Kill released the Ian MacKaye (of Fugazi and Minor Threat) produced, Bikini Kill EP originally through the Kill Rock Stars label. This 20th anniversary reissue includes new liner notes, photos, excerpts from Bikini Kill’s zines, and more.

With the Riot Grrrl insurgence by artists like Pussy Riot and Lizzo, it is crucial to hear where the movement started and even more so to hear where it goes. Hopper, poignant but encouraging in the future of punk music, reminds readers, “We deserve better songs than any boy will ever write about us” (20).